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Price : £119.95 (Inc VAT at 20.00%)
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2m / 4m version of the popular UVD6P 2m / 70cm Wouxun handie has enhanced features, more robust design, better keypad and much more compared to the previous KG-UVD1P/L model.

Full Dual Band Handie!

Main Features:

  • Frequency Range: 4m (66-88MHz) and 2m (130-174MHz)
  • Work Mode:VL-V?VL-V?V-V?VL-VL can be set freely
  • SOS Function
  • 1750Hz tone
  • DTMF Encoding Function
  • CTCSS/DCS Scan(Digital/Analog)
  • Bright Flashlight Illumination
  • Band Can Be Set Freely on The Same Channel VHF TX-UHF RX or UHF TX-VHF RX
  • Output power VHF 5W/1W UHF 4W/1W
  • English Voice Guide
  • Digital FM Radio
  • Wide/Narrow Bandwidth Selection(25khz/12.5khz)
  • Priority Scan, Add Scanning Channel
  • High/Low Power Selection
  • Channel Name Edit and Display
  • 50 Groups CTSS/105Groups DCS
  • Multi Step Frequency:(5K/6.25K/10K/25K/50K/100K)
  • Multi Scan
  • VOX Transmission
  • Transmit Overtime Voice Prompt
  • Begin/End Transmitting BEEP Prompt
  • Auto/Manual Keypad Lock
  • Wire Clone, Programmable By Computer
  • Stopwatch Function
  • Low Voltage VOICE prompt
  • Busy Channel Lockout


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Frequency Range: 4m (66-88MHz) and 2m (130-174MHz)
Work Mode:VL-V?VL-V?V-V?VL-VL can be set freely
SOS Function
1750Hz tone
DTMF Encoding Function
CTCSS/DCS Scan(Digital/Analog)
Bright Flashlight Illumination
Band Can Be Set Freely on The Same Channel VHF TX-UHF RX or UHF TX-VHF RX
Output power VHF 5W/1W UHF 4W/1W
English Voice Guide
Digital FM Radio
Wide/Narrow Bandwidth Selection(25khz/12.5khz)
Priority Scan, Add Scanning Channel
High/Low Power Selection
Channel Name Edit and Display
50 Groups CTSS/105Groups DCS
Multi Step Frequency:(5K/6.25K/10K/25K/50K/100K)
Multi Scan
VOX Transmission
Transmit Overtime Voice Prompt
Begin/End Transmitting BEEP Prompt
Auto/Manual Keypad Lock
Wire Clone, Programmable By Computer
Stopwatch Function
Low Voltage VOICE prompt
Busy Channel Lockout



Building on the success of the famous KG-UVD1P, the new UVD6P has enhanced features, more robust design, better keypad and much more

Full Dual Band Handie! Main Features:
  • Frequency Range: 144-146&430-440 MHz (RX/TX)
  • Work Mode:U-V、U-V、V-V、U-U can be set freely
  • SOS Function
  • 1750Hz tone
  • DTMF Encoding Function
  • CTCSS/DCS Scan(Digital/Analog)
  • Bright Flashlight Illumination
  • Band Can Be Set Freely on The Same Channel VHF TX-UHF RX or UHF TX-VHF RX
  • Output power VHF 5W/1W UHF 4W/1W
  • English Voice Guide
  • Digital FM Radio
  • Wide/Narrow Bandwidth Selection(25khz/12.5khz)
  • Priority Scan, Add Scanning Channel
  • High/Low Power Selection
  • Channel Name Edit and Display
  • 50 Groups CTSS/105Groups DCS
  • Multi Step Frequency:(5K/6.25K/10K/25K/50K/100K)
  • Multi Scan
  • VOX Transmission
  • Transmit Overtime Voice Prompt
  • Begin/End Transmitting BEEP Prompt
  • Auto/Manual Keypad Lock
  • Wire Clone, Programmable By Computer
  • Stopwatch Function
  • Low Voltage VOICE prompt
  • Busy Channel Lockout

Technical Specification
Frequency Range

144-146&430-440 MHz (RX/TX)

Memory Channels

128 channels

Frequency Stability

±2.5ppm

Operating Voltage

7.4V

Operating Temperature

 -30 ℃〜 +60 ℃

Antenna Impedance

50Ω

Dimension

58×105×38(mm)

Weight

250g

Transmitter
Frequency Stability

±2.5PPM

RF Carrier Power

UHF: 4W VHF: 5W

Effective Radiation Power (ERP)

within pre-determined value ±7.5dB

Max. Frequency Deviation

Channel Space: 25KHz  ±5KHz

Channel Space: 12.5KHz ±2.5KHz

Audio Modulation

+3dB (pre-emphasis by 6dB between 0.3-3KHz)

Adjacent Channel Power

Channel Space: 25KHz  ≥70 dB

Channel Space: 12.5KHz  ≥60 dB

Spurious Radiation

≤-30dBm

Inter modulation Attenuation

≥40dB

Modulation Distortion

≤10%

Residual FM

≤-35dB

Residual AM

≤3%

Receiver
Sensitivity (12dB SINAD )

0.16µV

Squelch Rejection Sensitivity

≤0.8µV

Squelch Sensitivity

≤0.2µV

Audio Output power

500mW

Audio Distortion

≤5%

Audio Response

( 300-3000Hz)  +1 to -3dB

Co-channel Rejection

≥-8.0dB

Performance of Amplitude Limiter

≤3

Adjacent Channel Selection

Channel Space: 25KHz  ≥70 dB

Channel Space: 12.5KHz  ≥60 dB

Inter-modulation

≥65 dB

Resistance

≥84 dB

Spurious Radiation

9KHz-1GHz≤-57dBm

1GHz-4GHz≤-47dBm

If you have been watching the amateur radio market in the last few years, especially on Ebay, you will have noticed the huge number of cheap Chinese hand held radios available. These radios operate on either 2m or 70cm ham bands with repeater shifts, CTCSS, scanning, memories and all the bells and whistles that the average radio amateur would need. But the real reason these radios grab your attention, is the price. Three years ago I bought my first Chinese 2m band hand held, brand new for AU$35.

I am a true Scotsman and therefore appreciate good value. Or to put it another way, I’m as tight as a camels bum in a sandstorm. So it’s no surprise that I’ve tried a good number of these “cheap and cheerful” radios. Some of them are dreadful, I won’t name names, if you’ve had one you’ll know. But some of them are quite good. One of my favourites is the Fiedaxin FD150 or 450. It’s available new for AU$80 to 100 and works well.

But there’s no such thing as a free lunch. Or a cheap top spec radio, so there must be shortfalls. And from my recent experience, here they are-

1. These radios are built to be sold for commercial use, so they are really intended to be computer programmed and locked in memory mode and only used on a few channels. Because of this, the procedure to save a memory channel can often be quite laborious. For example, some radios require all memories to be entered through a menu system, where transmit frequency, receive frequency, transmit subtone and receive subtone had to be entered separately. This is not a problem once you are accustomed to the procedure, but a far cry from purpose built amateur gear which saves all the settings in one or two key strokes. Although not all Chinese radios are like this, for example the Fiedaxin is much simpler.

2. No memory skip function. You scan all memory channels, or none or them.

3. The antennas are rarely much good. Changing the antenna requires buying an adaptor as all Chinese hand helds have a male SMA plug which is the opposite way to Japanese radios. Fortunately these adaptors are becoming much more common.

4. No DTMF. Not much use if IRLP or Echolink is your thing.

5. The receivers are incapable of coping with strong signals on nearby frequencies.

The last one is the big one. If any fault will put you off buying a Chinese hand held, this is it. I occasionally stay in a hotel in Brisbane and have found it to be the perfect test bed for checking receiver performance. It’s on top of a hill with commercial transmitters on the roof. From the balcony, a Yaesu operated with no noticeable problems. An Alinco, a radio known for being prone to having problems rejecting strong nearby signals, worked OK but with a few crackles and pops which caused me to miss the odd word. A Fiedaxin just didn’t work at all. The receiver was totally dead. It wasn’t noisy or difficult to read, it just refused to receive anything across the whole band. I thought the radio had failed completely until I got a phone call from the bloke I was calling saying he was receiving me at S9 and asking why I wasn’t answering. In rural areas the Fiedaxin worked very well, in fact I couldn’t fault it. But in strong RF areas, forget it. I gave up on Chinese hand helds partly because of this and partly as I wanted dual bands and DTMF. So I bought another Alinco.

Then came the Wouxun KG-UVD1. Closely followed by the slightly updated KG-UVD1P. I’m told its pronounced woo-shin and not wooks-sun as everyone thinks it is. I wonder how the Chinese pronounce KG-UVD1P?

The KG-UVD1 is the first Chinese dual band radio to make it big. Even though it’s got two frequency displays, it is not a true dual VFO receiver. The wording on the box says “dual stand by” which means it will monitor both frequencies, but if one receives a signal, the other is muted until both are free.

The updated “P” model has CTCSS scanning which will find and display a received signals subtone. It also has DTMF (Woohoo!!!) There are also a few minor differences in the operation, such as the non-P will automatically select to transmit on whichever display last received a signal. Where the P just stays set to whichever you selected. Which makes a lot more sense to me. There may be other small differences, but I’ve only used the P.



The KG-UVD1P is available in a selection of frequency limits. It can be locked onto amateur bands only, or cover much wider bands. Such as-

137 – 174MHz & 350 – 470MHz (RX/TX)
137 – 174MHz & 400 – 480MHz (RX/TX)
137 – 174MHz & 420 – 520MHz (RX/TX)
137 – 174MHz & 400 – 470MHz (RX/TX)
137 – 174MHz & 245 – 250MHz (RX/TX)
137 – 174MHz & 216 – 280MHz (RX/TX)
137 – 174MHz & 225 – 226MHz (RX/TX)
144 – 146MHz & 430 – 440MHz (RX/TX)
144 – 148MHz & 420 – 450MHz (RX/TX)

I bought the 137 – 174 and 400 – 480 as it covers marine band and UHF CB. Although I should remind everyone that the KG-UVD1P is not type approved for use on these bands and should not be used outside the amateur bands. Unless of course there is an emergency. So no harm in being prepared.

The set is becoming popular in the USA as it can cover their 220MHz band. A spot where budget priced equipment is not common.

If your set is limited to ham bands only it may not be possible to open it up to cover a larger range. Unlike many Japanese radios the frequency limits seem to be set by Wouxun in the factory. They could probably be altered if the correct software was available. But I have not heard of that being done yet. (Note added 24/1/10- since writing this, I have discovered software to reprogram the band edge limits. It is available free on the web but try it at your own risk)

Any frequency or memory channel can be put on either A or B display. So it can have two VHF or two UHF if you want. The A/B button selects which display will transmit. And the TDR button switches off the display not selected. It has direct frequency input via the numbered keypad. The same keypad works DTMF if transmitting (P model only). There are 30 menus to set up the radio. All the usual functions are handled this way. Repeater shifts, subtones, memory programming. The first 9 menus have shortcuts to them on the number keys, so the more common functions can be accessed quickly, such as squelch level, transmit power etc. It has a narrow/wide option which on the P model works on both transmitter deviation and reciever filter width. The non-P may only work on transmit deviation, as do most other Chinese radios with this function. The narrow option will be handy if you travel to Europe where the amateur bands are on 12.5KHz channel spacing. It also has an incredibly annoying end of transmission beep, and an equally annoying beginning of transmission beep. Fortunately they both turn off.

The antenna seems to be reasonably good on this radio. Its 20cms long which is much longer than most Chinese hand helds, which seems to help the performance.

The memory programming is not as bad as some, but not as straight forward as it could be either. A menu has to be selected to store a frequency, and it will store the subtone without prompting. But it won’t store the repeater shift. The transmit and receive frequencies have to be stored separately. On a simplex channel this only requires the store button to be pressed twice as both are the same. But the procedure could have been simpler.

When I bought mine, I was given the computer programming lead and software for free. I can’t stress how useful these items are. Of the 128 memory channels I have over 100 of them filled. Most of them are repeater channels and all have the alphanumeric channel name entered. To do this through the front key pad would have required literally thousands of key strokes. With the software I can type all my requirements on a spread sheet, and then just click on download. Job done. The software is available free on the Wouxun website and the lead is available quite cheaply on Ebay either as a 9 pin serial or USB. With this software you can save the spreadsheets and have several different options depending on what area you plan to visit. You can download a different areas repeater channels in seconds.



There are also two functions which are only available via the software. Priority scan which will check one memory channel continually while scanning the rest. And each memory is able to be added to the scan bank, or skipped if not required. I only have amateur frequencies in the scan bank so all others are missed. A very useful feature.

The way the memories are accessed is also not as simple as it could be. The radio works in four modes. 1-Frequency 2-Name 3-Channel number 4-Frequency and channel number. In frequency mode the radio operates as any VFO style amateur radio does. The other three modes all access the memory channels. Name mode shows the alphanumeric name you have given that channel. I have the CB and marine channels all named (just in case I need to use them to make an emergency call you understand!) and the amateur repeaters are all named with their callsigns. Channel number mode shows just the number. Frequency and channel number mode shows both. I find myself switching back and forth between frequency and name mode. A or B display can be set to different modes so you can display a name on one when a frequency and number is on the other, but when switching the radio to frequency mode, both displays return to VFO style operation. This all sounds a bit long winded but its easy once you are familiar with it. To speed things up you just need to remember that menu 21 switches memory mode. Press - MENU - 2 - 1 - to access quickly.

The manual is reasonably good. Normally Chinese radios arrive with their manuals translated into barely comprehensible “Chinglish” and appear as if they were written by a 9 year old English student. The Wouxun manual looks to have been written by a Chinese adult who speaks English. There are a few words wrong but not a bad effort. This does beg the question, in the days of internet communication, why can’t these companies find someone from an English speaking country to proof read their manuals. It would make a big difference to the impression created in the western world.

So, is the KG-UVD1P worth buying? This radio is a huge step forward for Chinese cheapies. The P model has DTMF, the antenna works and it has scan skip on the memories if you have the software. I have yet to do the “hotel test” to prove the receivers rejection capabilities, but so far it looks good. It’s sensitive with good loud audio, and transmit is good too. These radios are available new from approx AU$135 to 160 depending on which version you buy and how much postage you pay. You can easily pay two or three times that much for a Japanese dual band radio. My last “budget” dual bander, an Alinco DJ-596, was AU$120 more expensive. A radio from the Japanese “big three” will be better, there’s no doubt about that, but if you want value for money you just can’t beat the Wouxun KG-UVD1(P). In fact it’s probably the best radio for tight fisted hams that’s presently available.

Review written by: Jack Cook VK2CJC / MM0AXL

Visit the Wouxun website
       

All Customer Reviews

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My default 2m HT Julian 23-12-2014
I bought this for access to 4m while visiting the UK. It has a narrow deviation, as often used on this band. Frequencies can be accessed via direct keyboard entry, including between bands, and repeater offset (or none) can be selected rapidly using the dedicated button. Emergency communications volunteers can use it to monitor other services. The charge cradle has a cassette deck power socket on the back, meaning travellers can use an approved local cable, rather than a dodgy adapter, and there is a 12 volt socket too. It is an easy to use, and well built radio.
       

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